What's a Portrait List and Why do I Need it?

 

Ok, picture this…You have now been pronounced Husband and Wife (yay!) you walk down the aisle, wait for the guests to start migrating to the cocktail hour and your family is supposed to stick around to take photos. Your nephew is starving so your sister takes him upstairs to feed him, your Grandpa doesn’t know where to go and while you are telling the photographer who you need in each photograph, your brother walks over to the bar and your mom goes to talk to guests. You turn around and no one you need in the photos is there.

Brett Hickman Photography

Brett Hickman Photography

Trust me, wrangling your immediate family on your wedding day isn’t all that easy, it’s best to have a plan.

Sit down with your babe and decide, what portraits are most important to you, and who needs to be in them. Create a list, and keep it simple. Start big and then dwindle. If you start with the group photos, those people who will not be getting individual portraits will then be able to go enjoy cocktail hour. As photos are being taken, the crowd will lessen and it will be smooth sailing. Having a portrait list of the order and groupings necessary will give your photographer control and it will be easier with one person (or 2) directing traffic.

Kristin Burrows Photography

Kristin Burrows Photography

During this process you are going to have your great Uncle’s girlfriend, (who is probably wearing white) come up to you and expect to be in the family photos. Instead of having to address the fact that, that just isn’t happening, let the photographer read off this list of who is in and go from there. People will want to be in photos, so let the photographer take charge and stick to the list. There will be plenty of time during the reception and dancing for others to get their picture taken with you.

Kristin Burrows Photography

Kristin Burrows Photography

A photo booth during cocktail hour (or through out the reception) is a great way to make sure that everyone has the chance, at their leisure, to take photos and write their well wishes to you in a fun keepsake album.

Remember the family portraits taken immediately after ceremony should be short and sweet, the more streamlined you can make it on paper, the better! Let everyone know ahead of time “Hey, after ceremony, stick around!” that way we aren’t hunting anyone down in order to get started.

Hom Photography

Hom Photography

If you still want to save even more time and be able to enjoy every second of your cocktail hour, scroll down to read why we are PRO first look and remember, first looks aren’t just for the bride and groom!

Before we go, Here is an example of where to start with a portrait list. Feel free to adjust as your family may be larger or smaller. Also, Begin with whichever family is larger, that way as you dwindle the crowd will too! Make sure to go over your list in your final details meeting with your photographer and planner to make sure each shot is do-able and will fall into day of timeline nicely.

EX: Bride’s Family - All these shots will include Bride and Groom!

Group: Grandfather, Grandmother, Mother, Father, Brother (name), Sister (name), Aunts (if you want included) Uncles (if you want included) Nieces & Nephews, Cousins.

*note get the photos with kids (and their parents) first and then let them go, attentions spans are hard to keep.

Grandparents: Grandmother and Grandfather

Immediate Family: Mother, Father, Brother, Sister

Parents: Mother, Father

Individuals: (if first look wasn’t already done) - Mother with Bride - Father With Bride

Repeat for Groom’s Side!

 
Karen Sieger